The Moral Mandate for Freedom: Reflections on Centesimus Annus

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Professor Buttiglione notes that the encyclical Centesimus Annus marks the beginning of a 'springtime in Christian social doctrine' for recognizing the importance of economic freedom.

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"Professor Buttiglione notes that the encyclical Centesimus Annus marks the beginning of a 'springtime in Christian social doctrine' for recognizing the importance of economic freedom. Not only is it practically important to promote economic liberty - it is also a moral obligation. Free markets succeed because they permit the proper interaction of human capital (creativity, intelligence, and virtue) with natural capital (land, resources, and machinery). The harnessing of these two types of capital naturally results in a free market, which, left to develop within a properly defined juridical and moral framework, proves to be the most effective and humane means of meeting basic human needs. Besides effectively producing wealth, the free market is also the most humane economic system possible, for it respects human dignity and freedom. A humane economy can only be achieved when economic structures are ordered to provide avenues for men and women to exercise their freedom in relation to the truth about who they are." - from the Introduction

With an introduction by Gregory Gronbacher.

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Additional Info

Edited By No
Translated By No
ISBN No
Page Count 14
Publisher Acton Institute
Year Published 1997
Book Excerpt N/A
SKU 1159

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